Art in the Capitol

Art in the Capitol

The Art in the Capitol program features work throughout the Capitol Complex and offers Maine artists an additional venue for their work. It is designed to expand the audience for Maine artists or artists working in Maine on Maine-based themes.

All Art in the Capitol exhibits are free and open to the public. Exhibitions are self-guided and may be viewed during the building hours where the exhibition is on display. Building hours: Maine Arts Commission Office 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday; Capitol and Burton M. Cross Buildings 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

For more information about Art in the Capitol, contact Julie Horn, Visual Arts Director at vog.eniam@nroh.eiluj.

CURRENTLY ON DISPLAY

Maine Veteran Artists Showcase 

September 1 - November 30, 2017.   

The Maine Arts Commission is proud to present an exhibition of Veteran’s work in partnership with The VA Maine Healthcare Systems-Togus. These artworks on display are created by Veteran Maine artists. A majority of the work can be viewed throughout the Capitol Complex, hanging predominantly in the Burton M. Cross Building.

The Togus facility provides a variety of outpatient and adaptive therapy programs for Maine’s Veteran population including visual arts, poetry and performance. This therapy is individualized, incorporating a Veteran's past, present and future interests and lifestyle.  Weaving the concept of healthy living into treatment ensures improved functioning, enhanced independence and successful involvement in all aspects of life. Their goal is to promote lifelong health and well-being through regular participation in meaningful leisure pursuits, regardless of disability.  This exhibit serves to recognize veterans' service, showcase their art or craft, and encourage them to pursue their passion. It is the Art Commission's hope that every veteran feels that he or she has a place to promote their art, no matter their skill level or their passion. Please take the time to read the wall labels accompanying the work to learn more about these talented and dedicated individuals, including quotes about how art plays a key role in their health and quality of life.

This program asks that you show your support for those that have served by purchasing and displaying their art. If Interested, please contact Courtney Oliver at vog.av@revilO.yentruoC.   Photo: Scott Ainsworth, Bass Harbor Light, photography, 16 x 20. 

Artists of the Forest

September 19 - December 31, 2017 

Artists of the Forest is based on the words, works and images of traditional artists who live and work in the largest expanse of intact forest in the eastern United States- The Northern Forest. 

This region is America’s oldest working woodlands and is also home to a remarkable range of traditional artists. Whether shaping snowshoes, building birch bark canoes or crafting twig furniture, these artists artfully balance skill with traditional knowledge – keeping alive an important part of this region’s heritage.

Many of these art forms continue because they fit into a self-sufficient lifestyle that is an essential part of living in the region. Such practices continue because their makers choose to keep them going, adapting them to fit contemporary circumstances and new markets, while at the same time, affording them the freedom to live and work in a place they love.

Being able to rely on one’s own talents and utilize nearby resources has great resonance for these artists who make this region their home, requiring a strong sense of purpose, resourcefulness and ingenuity. Featuring portraits of such traditional artists as Woodcarver Tom Cote, Canoe Maker Steve Cayard, Furniture maker Melvin Roy and Snowshoe maker Bill Mackowski, the touring exhibit explores these artists deep connection to the woods and the work they create.

 Organized by Cultural Resources, the exhibit toured the Northern Forest region for two years and featured the work of participating artists. It was funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, The Quimby Family Foundation and the Maine Community Foundation.

Woodcarving by Tom Cote, Limestone, photo by Peter Dembski 

Recent Exhibitions

Works from The Bangor Art Society

    Michael Vermette
    Waiting on the Market, oil on canvas
  

The Maine Arts Commission is honored to show the work of The Bangor Art Society who boasts the oldest, continuous art society not only in Maine but in the nation! They were established in 1875 as a small group of artists who joined together to form an association for the purpose of promoting art and extending art education in Bangor. In the beginning they offered programs that stressed exhibitions of Arts and Crafts, Paintings, Photographs and Prints. Its membership has been distinct and diverse including that of Marsden Hartley, who conducted painting classes for the society during the winter months in the 1940’s. In the 1950’s their name changed from Bangor Art Association to the Bangor Society of Arts and then to the Bangor Art Society. One hundred and forty one years later they are still an alliance of artists of all ages who are dedicated to promoting art and encouraging the creative spirit through a variety of programs, events and scholarships to art students.

Works in this exhibition can be found on both the ground floor and second floor of the State House and are for sale. The work will be up through September 15, 2017. For any questions about the artists or purchasing their work please contact Teddi-Jann Covell, president of The Bangor Art Society at thebangorartsociety.com.

James Linehan, Maine Artist

    James Linehan
    Woods Walk, acrylic on paper 42" x 62"
  

James Linehan is a Maine artist currently living in Bangor. He has been with the University of Maine since 1983 working in both capacities as an art professor and chairman of the Department of Art. Linehan’s academic accomplishments include chairing committees that led to the renovation of Lord Hall Gallery and the addition of a BFA degree to the Art Department’s curriculum. Additionally, Jim participated in the planning, design, and fundraising for the Wyeth Center for Studio Art, which came to fruition in September of 2013.

His education includes a BFA, MA and MFA and his work has been exhibited extensively in New York City and throughout the United States, as well as one solo show in Tokyo, Japan; two in Sapporo, Japan; Finland and Jordan. He has completed twenty public commissions including fifteen in Maine. James’s work is represented in thirty public and corporate collections including L.L. Bean, Bank of America, The Portland Museum of Art, Bates College, US Department of State Art Bank, Texaco, UNUM, Eaton Vance of Boston, MBNA and the Farnsworth Museum.  He is currently represented by Littlefield gallery in Winter Harbor, ME. You can also view his work online at jameslinehanart.com.

The work will be up (now) through January 1, 2018 and is located in the Governor’s reception area (2nd floor).

Works by Olena Babak and Judy Taylor

The Maine Arts Commission presented the work of two of Maine’s most talented painters, Judy Taylor and Olena Babak. After meeting at a plein air class several years ago, Judy and Olena have continued to inspire each other and have combined their talents on several projects.   At the Met

Judy began her artistic career with an intensive education in New York and Chicago. In 1996 relocated to Maine as the Artist-in-Residence at Acadia National Park. She currently maintains her studio and teaches there while also conducting workshops in Austin, New York, Italy and France. Her work is in many public and private collections including: Johns Hopkins University, the United States Park System, Friends of Acadia, and the Jackson Laboratory.

Olena Babak is an award winning, classically trained artist, whose landscapes and figurative works can be found in numerous galleries and collections in the U.S. and abroad. Some of her selected awards from 2016 include: Best Representation of Rockies National Park, Artist’s Choice Plein Air Richmond, 1st place Quick Draw & People's Choice Award Finger Lakes Plein Air. She was also a recipient of the Hudson River Fellowship in New York. Formerly she taught at the Academy of Classical Design, but now offers private workshops and classes in her studio on Great Moose Lake in central Maine. About her work she states, “Trained in the academic traditions of the French and Russian schools, I strive to push the limits of lighting and color in the process of capturing mood and enchantment in ever changing light and surroundings.”

You can learn more about Olena’s work at olenababak.com and more about Judy's work at judytaylorstudio.com. 

Painting Islands: Uniting Community with Art

    Howie Montenko
    Swan Island Quarry
   

The Maine Arts Commission announced the opening of a special exhibit in its Art in the Capitol program. “Painting Islands: Uniting Community with Art” by Maine photographer Howie Motenko explores collaborative art using the photographic technique of light painting on all 15 of Maine’s un-bridged, year-round islands.

“We selected these photographs to showcase Maine’s rich island heritage, and the ways in which the arts can bring communities together,” said Julie Horn, the Visual Arts Program Director for the Maine Arts Commission and the curator for Art in the Capitol. “These photos are lush with color and light and bring attention to one of Maine’s provincial regions, which make them a perfect fit for the Governor’s Reception area.”

Motenko’s mission in the “Painting Islands” project, funded in part by the Maine Arts Commission, was to create participatory art with each island community through the medium of light painting photography. The result is 15 highly color saturated, archival pigment prints that represent Maine’s island community’s choices of images that best represent them. For a full year beginning in June of 2015, Motenko, working in partnership with the Maine Seacoast Mission and the Island Institute, visited, discussed and documented each island. The artistic collaboration began with island residents selecting a subject that resonated most strongly with their community. Next, at dusk, island volunteers “light painted” their self-selected scene with flashlights to complete the artistic collaboration: they illuminated the most significant image of their community while Motenko created a long-exposure photograph of it during the blue hour. The relationship of the artist’s vision and the islanders’ combined illumination created a glowing image reflecting each island’s unique identity and collective values. The project is designed to create a stronger sense of community for each island. To learn more about this project please visit www.paintingislands.com.

Please click here to view past exhibitions.

Calendar

Mon, Aug 28 - Fri, Dec 8   Portland, ME
Why We Fought: American WWI Posters and the Art of Persuasion View »
Thu, Oct 5 - Fri, Dec 8   Gorham, ME
Resonance and Memory: The Essence of Landscape View »
Fri, Oct 27 - Sat, Dec 2   Hallowell, ME
CSA: Community Supporting Arts Exhibition at Harlow Gallery View »
 

Maine Arts Commission News

Rep. Pingree appointed to National Endowment for the Arts advisory council View »
SMU Study Shows How Distance Influences Arts Attendance View »
Maine music teacher wins prestigious 'Teacher of the Year' award View »
 

Press Release

Maine Craft Apprentice Program - Deadline Dec. 8 View »
Veterans Honored in New Exhibit at Museum L-A View »
CMCA Sunday Salons | Materiality Exhibition Artist Talks View »